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2022/2023

Complementary Disciplinary Training in Mathematics

Code: 44296 ECTS Credits: 10
Degree Type Year Semester
4317414 Teacher Training for Secondary Schools, Vocational Training and Language Centres OB 0 A

Contact

Name:
Jordi Deulofeu Piquet
Email:
jordi.deulofeu@uab.cat

Use of Languages

Principal working language:
catalan (cat)

External teachers

Carles Dorce (UB)
Joan Carles Naranjo (UB)
Joan Vicenš Gˇmez Urgelles (UPC)
Josep Fortiana (UB)
Maria Rosa Massa (UPC)

Prerequisites

There are no prerequisites

Objectives and Contextualisation

This module aims to provide the most relevant mathematical complements to teach mathematics in secondary school. It is divided into three blocks:
										
											
										
											
										
											1. Key Concepts and Problem Solving (3 ECTS). The aim of this blog is to use problems to encourage and motivate the learning of mathematics.
										
											
										
											
										
											2. Key Mathematics Topics from a Historical Perspective (4 ECTS). Teaching mathematics requires a solid knowledge of the subject that goes beyond the strict content that is taught in ESO and baccalaureate. Teachers need to have a training background that gives them a broad and integrated perspective of the mathematical concepts and procedures they need to convey and that they know the origin and its evolution over time.
										
											
										
											3. Modeling (3 ECTS). Mathematical modeling is an important part of the High School Mathematics Curriculum. For this reason, examples will be developed for both ESO and Baccalaureate

Competences

  • Acquire strategies to encourage student effort and enhance their capacity to learn by himself and others, and develop thinking skills and decision-making to facilitate autonomy, confidence and personal initiative.
  • Communicate and justify conclusions clearly and unambiguously to both specialist and non-specialist audiences.
  • Communicate effectively both verbally and non-verbally.
  • Continue the learning process, to a large extent autonomously.
  • Integrate knowledge and use it to make judgements in complex situations, with incomplete information, while keeping in mind social and ethical responsibilities.
  • Know the mathematics curriculum, and the body of didactic knowledge about the teaching and learning of mathematics.
  • Make effective use of integrated information and communications technology.
  • Possess the necessary learning skills to carry out continuous training in both content and teaching of mathematics and general aspects of the teaching profession.
  • Solve problems in new or little-known situations within broader (or multidisciplinary) contexts related to the field of study.
  • Use acquired knowledge as a basis for originality in the application of ideas, often in a research context.
  • Work in teams and teams (the same field or interdisciplinary) and develop attitudes of participation and collaboration as an active member of the community.

Learning Outcomes

  1. Collaborate in implementing didactic initiatives in a group.
  2. Communicate and justify conclusions clearly and unambiguously to both specialist and non-specialist audiences.
  3. Continue the learning process, to a large extent autonomously.
  4. Create an atmosphere conducive to interaction and acknowledge the contributions that pupils make to foster mathematics learning in the classroom.
  5. Demonstrate knowledge of contexts in which use is made of the different areas of mathematics in the secondary school curriculum, underlining the functional nature of mathematics.
  6. Demonstrate knowledge of the different types of continuing education.
  7. Demonstrate knowledge of the educational and cultural value of the mathematics content taught in secondary school and integrate it into the framework of science and culture.
  8. Demonstrate knowledge of the history of the different areas of mathematics and recent and future developments in them, to show their dynamism and lend meaning to school mathematics, highlighting the historical origins of mathematical knowledge.
  9. Identify and plan how to resolve situations in education that affect pupils with different capacities and learning paces.
  10. Integrate knowledge and use it to make judgements in complex situations, with incomplete information, while keeping in mind social and ethical responsibilities.
  11. Know and use internet resources and software to teach mathematics in secondary school.
  12. Show mastery of oral and written expression in teaching.
  13. Solve problems in new or little-known situations within broader (or multidisciplinary) contexts related to the field of study.
  14. Use acquired knowledge as a basis for originality in the application of ideas, often in a research context.

Content

Key concepts and problem solving (3 credits) 
Key math topics from a historical perspective (4 credits)
Mathematical Modeling (3 credits)

Methodology

All face-to-face sessions will be with the whole class group. However, as indicated in the methodology, there will be sessions where small group work will be done in the classroom under the supervision of the teacher.
										
											
										
											The methodology will include the following types of activities:
										
											
										
											- Teacher exhibition.
										
											
										
											- Use of the virtual campus. Discussion forums.
										
											
										
											- Cooperative work.
										
											
										
											- Student exhibitions.
										
											
										
											- Personal work of students.
										
											
										
											- Case study and practical work in the classroom.
										
											
										
											- Mechanisms of linking the theory and work done with the sessions of the Practicum
										
											
										
											The proposed teaching methodology and assessment may undergo some modification depending on the attendance restrictions imposed by the health authorities. 
"The proposed methodology involves a face-to-face development of the subject. If it were necessary to move to a semi-face-to-face development, the theoretical part
it would be done by videoconference (through teams) and the practical part would be done in person, but dividing the group into two subgroups.
If it were necessary to return to a confinement everything would be done through teams and the virtual campus.
In any case it would always be synchronously according to the timeline of the subject

Annotation: Within the schedule set by the centre or degree programme, 15 minutes of one class will be reserved for students to evaluate their lecturers and their courses or modules through questionnaires.

Activities

Title Hours ECTS Learning Outcomes
Type: Directed      
Oral presentations 30 1.2 11, 4, 5, 7, 6, 8, 14, 3
Practical cases 30 1.2 12, 1, 11, 4, 5, 7, 6, 9, 14, 10, 13, 2
Type: Supervised      
Analysis of modeling situations 30 1.2 12, 11, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 14, 10, 13, 2, 3
Type: Autonomous      
Personal study 50 2 11, 5, 7, 8, 9, 14, 10, 13, 3
Proposed activities 60 2.4 12, 1, 11, 5, 7, 8, 14, 10, 13, 2, 3

Assessment

The following will be required to be entitled to the final assessment:
										
											
										
											Compulsory attendance at a minimum of 80% of class sessions.
										
											
										
											The delivery of all the practices and exercises of evaluation within the indicated terms
										
											
										
											The set of assessment activities will be as follows:
										
											
										
											Key concepts and problem solving (30% of the module)
										
											
										
											The evaluation will consist of a final work (which will have a weight of 50% in the final grade) and will be done in groups, as well as the works or activities that are proposed throughout the course (with a weight of 40%) and this case preferably individual. The other 10% will be class attendance and participation.
										
											
										
											Mathematical Modeling (30% of the module)
										
											
										
											50% of the evaluation will consist of a final work that will be done preferably in groups, and 40% of the works or activities that are proposed throughout the course and in this case individually. The other 10% will be class attendance and participation.
										
											
										
											Key mathematics topics from a historical perspective (40% of the module)
										
											
										
											The evaluation of this part will consist of individual work with a weight of 40% and group work, with a weight of 50%. 10% corresponds to class attendance and participation.
										
											
										
											
										
											The works, for any of the groups, must be delivered within the deadlines indicated by the respective teachers of each group.
										
											
										
											The final grade is the result of the operation: 0.3 x Note of key concepts and problem solving + 0.3 x Modeling note + 0.4 x Historical perspective note

Assessment Activities

Title Weighting Hours ECTS Learning Outcomes
Mathematics history group work 40% 20 0.8 12, 1, 11, 5, 7, 6, 8, 14, 10, 13, 2, 3
Practical modeling work 30% 15 0.6 12, 1, 11, 4, 5, 7, 6, 9, 14, 10, 13, 2, 3
Practical problem solving work 30% 15 0.6 12, 11, 5, 7, 14, 10, 13, 2, 3

Bibliography

Conceptes clau i resolució de problemes i modelització

Bibliografia bàsica

  • Blum, W.; Galbraith, Henn, H.W. And Niss, M.. (2007) Modelling and applications in mathematics education. 1 ed. New York: Springer.
  • COMAP.2000. “Matemáticas y vida cotidiana”. Addison-Wesley
  • Courant, R i Robbins, H. (1971) ¿Qué es la matemática? Madrid. Aguilar.
  • Deulofeu,J. i Altres (2016). “Aprender a enseñar matemáticas en la educación secundaria obligatòria”.Editorial Sintesis.
  • Davis, P. i Hersh, R. (1988) Experiencia matemática. Barcelona. Labor. (Traducció de l’obra (1982) The Mathematical Experience.Boston. Birkhäuser.)
    • Chevallard, Y., Bosch, M. & Gascón, J. (1997): Estudiar matemáticas. El eslabón perdido entre la enseñanza y el aprendizaje, Horsori/ICE UB: Barcelona.
    • Devlin, K. (2002) El lenguaje de las matemáticas. Barcelona. Robinbook. (Traducció de l’obra (1998) The Language of Mathematics. NY. Freeman.)
    • Gómez,J. 2007 “La matemática como reflejo de la realidad”. FESPM, servicio de publicaciones.  http://www.fespm.es/
    • Gómez,J. (2013) “Els nombres i el seu encant” Institut d’Estudis Illerdencs
    • Guzmán, Miguel de  (1991) Cómo pensar mejor. Labor
    • ICTMA. The International Community of Teachers of Mathematical Modelling and Applications  http://www.ictma.net/conferences.html
    • http://www.icmihistory.unito.it/ictma.php#8
      • Klein, F. (1927): Matemática elemental desde el punto de vista superior, Biblioteca Matemática: Madrid. (Reeditat per Ed. Nivola, 2006).
      • Kline, Morris. (1976) El fracaso de la matemática moderna. Siglo XXI Editores.
      • Lakatos, I. (1978) Pruebas y refutaciones. La lógica del descubrimiento matemático. Madrid. Alianza Editorial. (Traducció de l’obra (1976) Proofs and Refutations. The Logic of Mathematical Discovery. Cambridge University Press.)
      • Perelman, Yakov.  Problemas y experimentos recreativos. Disponible a http://www.librosmaravillosos.com/problemasyexperimentos/
      • Polya, G. (1965) Cómo plantear y resolver problemas. Mexico. Trillas. (Traducció de l’obra (1945) How to solve it. NY. Princeton University Press.)

Bibliografia complementària

 

  • Alsina,C. Burgués,C. Fortuny. 2001.“Ensenyar Matemàtiques”. Graó.
  • Alsina,C. En general qualsevol de les seves obres son recomanables per complementar l’assignatura. . 
  • Gómez, Joan (1998). Tesi doctoral. “Contribució al estudi dels processos de modelització en l'ensenyament / aprenentatge de les matemàtiques a nivell universitari" http://www.tdx.cesca.es/TDX-0920105-165302/
  • NCTM (2003) Principios y Estándares para la Educación Matemática. Granad Sociedad andaluza de Educación Matemática THALES. (Versión original en inglés: Principles and standards for school mathematics. 2000)
  • Niss, M. (2003) Mathematical Competencies and the learning of Mathematics : The  Danish KOM Project. A A. Gagatsis; S. Papastavridis (Eds.). 3rd Mediterranean Conference on Mathematics Education. Athens – Hellas 3-5 January 2003. Athens:  The Hellenic Mathematical Society (pp 115 – 124). <http://www7.nationalacademies.org/mseb/Mathematical_Competencies_and_the_Learning_of_Mathematics.pdf>.
  • Mundo Matemático (2014). Coleccionables de RBA. Varis  títols.
    • Pólya, G. (1954): Mathematics and Plausible Reasoning, (2 vols.), Princeton University Press: Princeton, NJ. [Traducció de José Luis Abellán, Matemáticas y Razonamiento Plausible, Tecnos: Madrid, 1966].

Perspectiva histórica de la matemàtica

Bibliografia bàsica

•          BOYER, C. B., Historia de la matemática, Editorial Alianza, Madrid, 1986.

•          CALINGER, R., (ed.), Vita Mathematica. Historical research and Integration with teaching, The Mathematical Association of America, Washington, 1996.

•          HILTON, P. i altres, Mathematical reflections. In a Room with Many Mirrors, Springer-Verlag, Nova York, 1997.

JAHNKE, H. N.; KNOCHE, N; OTTE, M. History of Mathematics and Education: Ideas and Experiences, Göttingen, Vanderhoeck und Ruprecht.

•          KATZ, V., (ed.), Using History to Teach Mathematics. An International Perspective, The Mathematical Association of America, Washington, 2000.

•          STEDALL, J. From Cardano’s Great Art to Lagrange’s Reflections: filling a gap in the history of Algebra, European Mathematical Society Publishing House, 2011.

•          TOEPLITZ, O., The Calculus. A Genetic Approach. The University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1963.

 

 

 

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Software

A specific program is not contemplated. Each teacher will indicate, when necessary, the free software that will be used.