This version of the course guide is provisional until the period for editing the new course guides ends.

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2022/2023

English Grammar II: Sentence

Code: 106280 ECTS Credits: 6
Degree Type Year Semester
2504212 English Studies FB 1 2
2504380 English and Catalan Studies OB 2 2
2504386 English and Spanish Studies OB 2 2
2504393 English and French Studies OB 2 2
2504394 English and Classics Studies OB 2 2

Contact

Name:
Mireia Llinąs Grau
Email:
mireia.llinas@uab.cat

Use of Languages

Principal working language:
english (eng)
Some groups entirely in English:
No
Some groups entirely in Catalan:
Yes
Some groups entirely in Spanish:
No

Teachers

Merce Coll Alfonso

Prerequisites

The knowledge learnt in the first-year subjects English Grammar I: From the Word to the Sentence and Introduction to Linguistics are taken for granted.

The course requires an initial level of English C1 (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages). 

Objectives and Contextualisation

The main objective of this subject is to introduce students to the basic concepts needed to analyse English sentences and their components.  

 

Competences

    English Studies
  • Describe and analyse—synchronically and comparatively—the main phonetic, phonological, morphological, syntactic, semantic and pragmatic properties of English and its historical development.
  • Students must have and understand knowledge of an area of study built on the basis of general secondary education, and while it relies on some advanced textbooks it also includes some aspects coming from the forefront of its field of study.
  • Take sex- or gender-based inequalities into consideration when operating within one's own area of knowledge. 
  • Understand and produce written and spoken academic texts in English at an advanced proficient-user level (C1).
  • Use digital tools and specific documentary sources for the collection and organisation of information.
  • Use written and spoken English for academic and professional purposes, related to the study of linguistics, the philosophy of language, history, English culture and literature.
    English and Catalan Studies
  • Act in one's own field of knowledge evaluating inequalities based on sex/gender.
  • Analyse the main phonetic, phonological, morphological, syntactic, lexical and semantic properties of the Catalan and English languages, their evolution throughout history and their current structures.
  • Make correct use of written and spoken English for academic or professional purposes, related to the study of language, history, culture and literature.
  • Students must have and understand knowledge of an area of study built on the basis of general secondary education, and while it relies on some advanced textbooks it also includes some aspects coming from the forefront of its field of study.
  • Understand and produce oral and written academic texts with appropriateness and fluency in distinct communicative contexts.
  • Use digital tools and specific documentary sources to gather and organise information.
    English and Spanish Studies
  • Analyse the main phonetic, phonological, morphological, syntactic, lexical and semantic properties of the English and Spanish languages, their evolution throughout history and their current structure.
  • Correctly use written and oral English and Spanish for academic and professional purposes, related to the study of linguistics, history, culture and literature.
  • Students must have and understand knowledge of an area of study built on the basis of general secondary education, and while it relies on some advanced textbooks it also includes some aspects coming from the forefront of its field of study.
  • Take sex- or gender-based inequalities into consideration when operating within one's own area of knowledge.
  • Understand and produce oral and written academic texts with appropriateness and fluency in distinct communicative contexts.
  • Use digital tools and specific documentary sources to gather and organise information.
    English and French Studies
  • Students must have and understand knowledge of an area of study built on the basis of general secondary education, and while it relies on some advanced textbooks it also includes some aspects coming from the forefront of its field of study.
  • Take sex- or gender-based inequalities into consideration when operating within one's own area of knowledge.
  • Understand and produce oral and written academic texts with appropriateness and fluency in distinct communicative contexts.
  • Use digital tools and specific documentary sources to gather and organise information.
  • Use spoken English and French correctly for academic and professional purposes related to the study of linguistics, history, culture and literature.
    English and Classics Studies
  • Describe and analyse synchronically and comparatively the main phonetic, phonological, morphological, syntactic, semantic and pragmatic properties of English, Greek and Latin, as well as their historical evolution.
  • Students must have and understand knowledge of an area of study built on the basis of general secondary education, and while it relies on some advanced textbooks it also includes some aspects coming from the forefront of its field of study.
  • Take sex- or gender-based inequalities into consideration when operating within one's own area of knowledge. 
  • Understand and produce oral and written academic texts with appropriateness and fluency in distinct communicative contexts.
  • Use digital tools and specific documentary sources to gather and organise information.
  • Use written and spoken English correctly for academic and professional purposes related to the study of English linguistics, history, culture, and literature.

Learning Outcomes

  1. Distinguish between grammatical gender and natural gender.
  2. Distinguish grammatical gender from natural gender.
  3. Express oneself orally in English, in an academic register and using appropriate terminology, in relation to the study of English linguistics and grammar.
  4. Identify, describe and analyse the main morphological and syntactic properties of the English language.
  5. Locate specialised and academic information and select this according to its relevance.
  6. Produce non-extensive specialised texts at an advanced proficient-user level (C1) on general linguistics and English grammar.
  7. Produce non-extensive specialised texts on general linguistics and English grammar at Advanced User level (C1).
  8. Produce non-extensive specialised texts on general linguistics and English grammar at an advanced proficient-user level (C1).
  9. Produce non-extensive specialised texts on general linguistics and English grammar.
  10. Understand and apply the knowledge and skills acquired from basic and advanced texts in linguistics and English grammar.
  11. Understand specialised academic texts at an advanced proficient-user level (C1) on general linguistics and English grammar.
  12. Understand specialised academic texts on general linguistics and English grammar at Advanced User level (C1).
  13. Understand specialised academic texts on general linguistics and English grammar at an advanced proficient-user level (C1).
  14. Understand specialised academic texts on general linguistics and English grammar.

Content

UNIT 1. Introduction

UNIT 2. Predicates and arguments

UNIT 3. Syntactic categories

UNIT 4. Constituents

UNIT 5. The structure of phrases

UNIT 6. The sentence as a phrase

UNIT 7. Embedded clauses 

UNIT 8. Questions

Methodology

Directed activities:

Lectures with IT support and group debate.

Supervised activities:

Exercises.

Back-up tutorials.

Autonomous activities:

Reading of manuals and textbooks.

Elaboration of study diagrams and summaries of texts.

Practical exercises (individual and in group).

Use of the Virtual Campus (Moodle).

 

Annotation: Within the schedule set by the centre or degree programme, 15 minutes of one class will be reserved for students to evaluate their lecturers and their courses or modules through questionnaires.

Activities

Title Hours ECTS Learning Outcomes
Type: Directed      
Lectures and group debate 50 2 3, 4, 6, 7, 9
Type: Supervised      
In-class exercises and individual tutorials 25 1 10, 11, 12, 14, 3, 4, 5
Type: Autonomous      
Reading, self-study, exercises and use of Moodle 50 2 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 2, 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

Assessment

  • This course is assessed through a quiz, a final exam and an assignment. Class attendance and participation is taken into account. 
  • The dates of tests and submissions are specified in the course calendar, published in Moodle at the beginning of the semester. Any change will be duly announced.
  • Students will obtain a Not assessed/Not submitted course grade unless they have submitted more than 35% of the assessment items.
  • In case of absence on the day of an exam (e.g. due to illness) students must provide a certificate to justify their absence to gain the right to re-assessment.
  • In the event of a student committing any irregularity that may lead to a significant variation in the grade awarded to an assessment activity, the student will be given a zero for this activity, regardless of any disciplinary process that may take place. In the event of several irregularities in assessment activities of the same subject, the student will be given a zero as the final grade for this subject.

Review of assessment items:

On carrying out each assessment activity, lecturers will inform students (on Moodle) of the procedures to be followed for reviewing all grades awarded, and the date on which such a review will take place.

Re-assessment:

Re-assessment for this subject will involve a final overall test assessing the complete course. The date and time will be announced by the Faculty. The following conditions apply:

  • Having obtained a minimum course mark of 3.5/10.
  • Having submitted all assessment items.
  • Having passed at least 35% of the course.
  • The final course mark if the student passes the re-assessment test is 5. Students cannot re-assess to improve their course mark.

VERY IMPORTANT: Total or partial plagiarism of any of the exercises will automatically be considered "fail" (0) for the plagiarised exercise. If plagiarism occurs for a second time, the entire course will be failed. PLAGIARISM is copying one or more sentences from unidentified sources, presenting it as original work (THIS INCLUDES COPYING PHRASES OR FRAGMENTS FROM THE INTERNET AND ADDING THEM WITHOUT MODIFICATION TO A TEXT WHICH IS PRESENTED AS ORIGINAL). Plagiarism is a serious offense. Students must learn to respect the intellectual property of others, identifying any source they may use, and take responsibility for the originality and authenticity of the texts they produce.

 

Assessment Activities

Title Weighting Hours ECTS Learning Outcomes
Assignment 15% 13 0.52 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 2, 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9
Exercises, class attendance and participation 5% 0 0 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 2, 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9
Final Exam 50% 6 0.24 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 2, 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9
Quiz 30% 6 0.24 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 2, 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

Bibliography

Aarts, Bas. (2001) English Syntax and Argumentation. 2nd edition. London: Macmillan Press.

Berry, Roger (2012). English Grammar. A resource book for students. New York: Routledge.

Brinton, Laurel (2000). The structure of modern English. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company.

Carnie, Andrew (2011) Modern Syntax: A Coursebook. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Haegeman, Liliane (1991) Introduction to Government  and Binding Theory. Oxford: Blackwell.

Llinàs, Mireia, Capdevila, Montserrat, Dominguez, Joaquín, Moyer, Melissa, Pladevall, Elisabet and Susagna Tubau (2014) Basic Concepts for the Analysisi of English Sentences, Bellaterra: Servei de Publicacions, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. 

Miller, Jim (2002) An Introduction to English Syntax. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.

Nelson, Gerald and Greenbaum, Sidney (2016). An Introduction to English Grammar. 4th Edition. London: Routledge.

Radford, Andrew (2016) Analysing English Sentences, Cambridge University Press.

Software

This subject does not require specific programmes.