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2022/2023

Geography of Inequality

Code: 104260 ECTS Credits: 6
Degree Type Year Semester
2503710 Geography, Environmental Management and Spatial Planning OT 4 1
2504216 Contemporary History, Politics and Economics OT 3 2
2504216 Contemporary History, Politics and Economics OT 4 1
2504216 Contemporary History, Politics and Economics OT 4 2

Contact

Name:
Antonio Miguel Solana Solana
Email:
antoniomiguel.solana@uab.cat

Use of Languages

Principal working language:
catalan (cat)
Some groups entirely in English:
No
Some groups entirely in Catalan:
Yes
Some groups entirely in Spanish:
No

Other comments on languages

Hi haurÓ lectures obligat˛ries en anglŔs.

Teachers

Antonio Miguel Solana Solana

Prerequisites

There is no requirement.

Objectives and Contextualisation

The aim of the subject is to study, from a theoretical and practical point of view, global inequalities and their local implications from the perspective of social geography. We will focus mainly on urban areas but also on other scales of analysis. The course will begin with a theoretical reflection on the concept of "inequality" and will continue to examine the spatial distribution of wealth and poverty and the geographies of exclusion and discrimination. Topics related to gender, social class and ethnic inequalities, the interaction between globalization and unequal development, historical trajectories and spatial models of inequality, migration and human and social mobility, local studies of segregation and urban inequality will be studied, and the links between social inequality, the environment and nature. Examples will be given from both the North and the Global South.

a) To know the main theoretical and conceptual contributions on issues related to inequality and social vulnerability, from a specifically territorial and urban perspective. Special emphasis will be placed on the economic and political factors behind the process of social and territorial inequality.

b) To adequately and accurately diagnose the phenomena of territorial inequality, social vulnerability and poverty. To have the ability to evaluate, based on quantitative and qualitative methods, the size and characteristics of the phenomenon.

c) Propose action measures to reverse situations of territorial inequality, social vulnerability and poverty through the appropriate use of urban and social policies.

Competences

    Geography, Environmental Management and Spatial Planning
  • Combine distinct techniques and methods of representation and spatial analysis in elaborating materials for transmitting results.
  • Critically analyse the relationship between society and the region applying the conceptual and theoretical framework of geography.
  • Students must be capable of collecting and interpreting relevant data (usually within their area of study) in order to make statements that reflect social, scientific or ethical relevant issues.
  • Students must develop the necessary learning skills to undertake further training with a high degree of autonomy.
    Contemporary History, Politics and Economics
  • Analyse the sociodemographic, geoeconomic and environmental dynamics at different territorial scales.
  • Assess the social, economic and environmental impact when acting in this field of knowledge.
  • Manage and apply data to solve problems.
  • Relate fundamental questions of the current economic situation with previous economic developments on the basis of the main elements of contemporary economic history.
  • Students must be capable of applying their knowledge to their work or vocation in a professional way and they should have building arguments and problem resolution skills within their area of study.
  • Students must be capable of collecting and interpreting relevant data (usually within their area of study) in order to make statements that reflect social, scientific or ethical relevant issues.

Learning Outcomes

  1. Combine distinct techniques and methods of representation and spatial analysis in elaborating materials for transmitting results.
  2. Consider problems of inequality, population distribution and urbanisation in the world, among other things.
  3. Examine how different social, economic, political and environmental processes create and transform spaces and social relationships.
  4. Explaining the structure of today's world from a geographical point of view.
  5. Identify and understand social and regional inequalities in society.
  6. Manage and apply data to solve problems.
  7. Propose viable projects and actions to boost social, economic and environmental benefits.
  8. Students must be capable of applying their knowledge to their work or vocation in a professional way and they should have building arguments and problem resolution skills within their area of study.
  9. Students must be capable of collecting and interpreting relevant data (usually within their area of study) in order to make statements that reflect social, scientific or ethical relevant issues.
  10. Students must develop the necessary learning skills to undertake further training with a high degree of autonomy.

Content

Conceptualization of inequality and social vulnerability
1.1. Key concepts: Inequality-Diversity; Social and territorial segregation; vulnerability and poverty; Social inclusion-exclusion; social polarization
1.2. intersectionality
1.3. Social/environmental/spatial justice. Wellfare and wellness. Redistribution Policies

The global scale of territorial inequality. Social inequality, territorial inequality: the perspective from political economy and unequal geographic development
2.1 Evolution of global inequality: Long view (history) and short view (recent past)
2.2 The inequality transition
2.3 Measures and indicators of inequality. Alternatives?
2.4 Neoliberal policies and the growth of social inequality

Topic 3. Global change, environmental change: inequality and vulnerability
3.1. External debt, ecological debt and unequal ecological exchange
3.2. Global (climate) change and inequality/vulnerability
3.3. (Neo)extractivism and land and resource grabbing
3.4. (Socio)-environmental justice and climate justice
3.5. Environmentalism of the poor
3.6. Alter-globalization movements

Topic 4. The local scale of territorial inequality: city and inequality
4.1 Territorial segregation: city of the rich and city of the poor
4.2 Merchandise city vs. redistributive city
4.3 Ghetto/Hyperghetto
4.4 Urbanism of fear and gated communities
4.5 Uneven health
4.6 The right to the city
4.7 Social and urban movements

Methodology

Master classes.
Debates.
Group work / challenge base learning
Reading of articles.
Oral presentations.

Teachers will dedicate approximately 15 minutes of some classes to allow their students to answer the evaluation questions of the teaching performance and the evaluation of the subject.

The teaching methodology and the evaluation proposed in the guide may undergo some modification subject to the onsite teaching restrictions imposed by health authorities.

Annotation: Within the schedule set by the centre or degree programme, 15 minutes of one class will be reserved for students to evaluate their lecturers and their courses or modules through questionnaires.

Activities

Title Hours ECTS Learning Outcomes
Type: Directed      
Classes in classroom 40 1.6 5, 3, 4
Type: Supervised      
Tutorials and evaluation 10 0.4 6, 7
Type: Autonomous      
Personal study + compulsory readings 60 2.4 10

Assessment

Evaluation

The first day of the class will be discussed in detail the evaluation activities. They will be uploaded to Moodle and will be discussed in the classroom.

On carrying out each evaluation activity, lecturers will inform students (on Moodle) of the procedures to be followed for reviewing all grades awarded, and the date on which such a review will take place.

Students will obtain a “Not assessed/Not submitted” course grade unless they have submitted more than 30% of the assessment items.

Reevaluation

There will be a re-evaluation of all those presented tests that have not passed the 5. The re-evaluation of the theoretical exams will be in the form of an exam. The re-evaluation of the rest of the activities will consist of referring the evidence. Re-evaluated activities score between 0 and 5.

The following activities are excluded from the recovery process: oral presentations, group work, tasks related to daily teaching activity.

Plagiarism

In the event of a student committing any irregularity that may lead to a significant variation in the grade awarded to an assessment activity, the student will be given a zero for this activity, regardless of any disciplinary process that may take place. In the event of several irregularities in assessment activities of the same subject, the student will be given a zero as the final grade for this subject.

Notice

In the event that tests or exams cannot be taken onsite, they will be adapted to an online format made available through the UAB’s virtual tools (original weighting will be maintained). Homework, activities and class participation will be carried out through forums, wikis and/or discussion on Teams, etc. Lecturers will ensure that students are able to access these virtual tools, or will offer them feasiblealternatives.

Assessment Activities

Title Weighting Hours ECTS Learning Outcomes
2 partial examns of evaluation of the 4 topics 30 3 0.12 4, 10, 8
Classroom participation 10 5 0.2 4, 7
Essay (from required readings) (individual) 15 8 0.32 5, 3
Oral presentation of the different phases of the project (in group) 15 6 0.24 1, 4
Project (in group) 30 18 0.72 6, 2, 10, 8, 9

Bibliography

Bauman, Zygmunt (2005). Vidas desperdiciadas. La modernidad y sus parias. Barcelona: Paidós.

Bauman Zygmunt (2001), La globalización (Consecuencias humanas). México: FCE.

Bauman Zygmunt (2012), Vidas desperdiciadas (La modernidad y sus parias). Barcelona: Paidós.

Bauman, Zygmunt (2014), ¿La riqueza de unos pocos beneficia a todos?. Barcelona: Paidós.

D’Alisa; Giacomo; Demaria, Federico; Kallis Giorgios (2015), Decrecimiento (Vocabulario para una nueva era). Barcelona: Icaria.

Escalante González, Fernando (2016), Historia mínima del neoliberalismo (Una historia económica, cultural e intelectual de nuestro mundo, de 1975 a hoy). México: Turner.

Göbel, Bárbara; Góngora-Mera, Manuel; Ulloa, A. (eds) (2014). Desigualdades socioambientales en América Latina a Göbel, Bárbara; Góngora-Mera, Manuel; Ulloa, ed.). Bogotá: Universidad Nacional de Colombia.

Hay, Iain; Beaverstock, Jonathan V. (2017), Handbook on wealth and the super-rich. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.

Harvey, David (2021), Espacios del capitalismo global. Hacia una teoría del desarrollo geográfico desigual. Madrid: Akal.

Islam, Nazrul; Winkel, John (2017). Climate Change and Social Inequality. DESA Working Paper

Jelin, Elizabeth; Motta, Renata, Costa, Sergio (2020). Repensar las desigualdades. Cómo se producen y entrelazan las asimetrías globales (y qué hace la gente con eso), Buenos Aires: Siglo Veintiuno.

Firebaugh, Glenn (2003), The new geography of global income inequality. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

Martínez Alier, Joan (2011). El ecologismo de los pobres (Conflictos ambientales y lenguajes de valores). Barcelona: Icaria.

Martínez Alier, Joan; Oliveras, Arcadi (2010). ¿Quién debe a quién? (Deudaexterna y deuda ecològica). Barcelona, Icaria.

Martínez Alier, Joan (2015), “Ecología política del extractivismo y justicia socio-ambiental”. INTERdisciplina, 3(7).

Milanovic, Branko (2016), A new approach for the age of globalization. Cmbridge: Harvard University Press.

Pardo Buendía, Mercedes; Ortega, Jordi (2018). “Justicia ambiental y justicia climática: el camino lento pero sin retorno, hacia el desarrollo sostenible justo”. Barataria. Revista Castellano-Manchega de Ciencias Sociales, (24), 83–100.

Pearce, Fred (2013). The landgrabbers (The new fight over who owns the earth). Londres: Penguin.

Piketty, Thomas (2014), L’economia de les desigualtats. Barcelona: Edicions 62.

Pulido, Laura (2016). “Flint, Environmental Racism, and Racial Capitalism”. Capitalism Nature Socialism, 5752(July).

Roberts, J. Timmons; Parks, Bradley C. (2009). “Ecologically unequal exchange, ecological debt, and climate justice: The history and implications of three related ideas for a new social movement”. International Journal of Comparative Sociology, 50(3–4), 385–409.

Sassen, Saskia (2015), Expulsiones. Brutalidad y complejidad en la economía global. Buenos Aires: Katz.

Secchi, Bernardo (2013). La ciudad de los ricos y la ciudad de los pobres. Madrid: Catarata.

Shiva, Vandana (2001). Biopirateria (El saqueo de la naturaleza y del conocimiento). Barcelona: Icaria.

Soja, Edward W (2014). En busca de la justicia espacial. València: Tirant.

Solana, Miguel; Badia, Anna; Cebollada, Àngel; Ortiz, Anna; Vera, Ana (2016). Espacios globales y lugares próximos (Setenta conceptos para entender la organización territorial del capitalismo global). Barcelona: Icaria.

Stiglitz, Joseph E.; Sen, Amartya; Fitoussi, Jean-Paul (2010), Medir nuestras vidas. Las limitaciones del PIC como indicador de progreso. Barcelona: RBA.

Urry, John (2017), Offshore (La deslocalización de la riqueza). Madrid: Capitán Swing.

Wacquant, L. (2010). Parias urbanos. Marginalidad en la ciudad a comienzos del milenio. Buenos Aires: Manantial.

 

Software

Word, excel, powerpoint. Representation techniques and territorial designs.