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2021/2022

The Formation of Europe 5th to 11th Centuries

Code: 100361 ECTS Credits: 6
Degree Type Year Semester
2500241 Archaeology OT 3 0
2500241 Archaeology OT 4 0
2500501 History OB 2 1
The proposed teaching and assessment methodology that appear in the guide may be subject to changes as a result of the restrictions to face-to-face class attendance imposed by the health authorities.

Contact

Name:
Ramˇn MartÝ Castellˇ
Email:
Ramon.Marti@uab.cat

Use of Languages

Principal working language:
catalan (cat)
Some groups entirely in English:
No
Some groups entirely in Catalan:
Yes
Some groups entirely in Spanish:
No

Teachers

Carolina Batet Company
TÓnia Alaix Gimbert

Prerequisites

Those established by the regulations of the degree: having completed the subject "Introduction to Medieval History" or "Medieval History" of the first year, in order to have achieved the minimum knowledge about the great processes of the Middle Ages in space and time. On this basis, the content of the syllabus corresponding to the studied period will be deepened.

Objectives and Contextualisation

In this subject will be deepened on the great socio-economic, political and cultural processes that occurred between the 5th and 11th centuries in the territory that would later be Europe. Thus, the past of European societies are studied from the disappearance of the Western Roman Empire to the formation and consolidation of feudalism in post-Carolingian societies. The economic and social aspects and the ideological constructions, in relation to the constitution of the high medieval kingdoms and the emergence of feudalism in the context of the dismemberment of the Carolingian Empire will be analyzed as a priority. For all these reasons, it will be necessary to examine the practices developed during late antiquity that lasted until the early medieval period, how they were transformed during this period, under what production guidelines and social order were organized, and what new ideological expressions they deployed between the 5th and 11th centuries. Although the central reference of the subject will be European history, it will be necessary to explain the connections with the processes that occur in the Middle East and North Africa, and all this, in relation to the diffusion of Christianity, formation and expansion of Islam and the Cesaropapism of the Eastern Empire. All these processes lay the foundations of the idea of Europe, which will be riveted in subsequent centuries until it is internally constituted and projected abroad. This is why it is so important to look for the roots, the origins and the bases of the hegemony of Europe in the world.

Competences

    Archaeology
  • Contextualizing and analysing historical processes.
  • Developing critical thinking and reasoning and communicating them effectively both in your own and other languages.
  • Managing the main methods, techniques and analytic tools in archaeology.
  • Students must be capable of applying their knowledge to their work or vocation in a professional way and they should have building arguments and problem resolution skills within their area of study.
  • Students must be capable of collecting and interpreting relevant data (usually within their area of study) in order to make statements that reflect social, scientific or ethic relevant issues.
  • Students must be capable of communicating information, ideas, problems and solutions to both specialised and non-specialised audiences.
  • Students must develop the necessary learning skills to undertake further training with a high degree of autonomy.
  • Students must have and understand knowledge of an area of study built on the basis of general secondary education, and while it relies on some advanced textbooks it also includes some aspects coming from the forefront of its field of study.
    History
  • Applying the main methods, techniques and instruments of the historical analysis.
  • Developing critical thinking and reasoning and communicating them effectively both in your own and other languages.
  • Mastering the basic diachronic and thematic concepts of the historical science.
  • Respecting the diversity and plurality of ideas, people and situations.
  • Students must be capable of applying their knowledge to their work or vocation in a professional way and they should have building arguments and problem resolution skills within their area of study.
  • Students must be capable of collecting and interpreting relevant data (usually within their area of study) in order to make statements that reflect social, scientific or ethical relevant issues.
  • Students must develop the necessary learning skills in order to undertake further training with a high degree of autonomy.

Learning Outcomes

  1. Accurately describing an artistic object with the specific language of art criticism.
  2. Analyse the historical processes that lead to armed conflict.
  3. Analysing the key issues that allow us to address the study of historical phenomena from a gender perspective.
  4. Applying both knowledge and analytical skills to the resolution of problems related to their area of study.
  5. Applying proper techniques and analytical tools in case studies.
  6. Applying techniques in order to quickly and completely understand texts in Latin.
  7. Assessing and critically solving the characteristic historiographical problems of gender history.
  8. Assessing and critically solving the historiographical problems of war studies.
  9. Autonomously searching, selecting and processing information both from structured sources (databases, bibliographies, specialized magazines) and from across the network.
  10. Carrying out oral presentations using appropriate academic vocabulary and style.
  11. Communicating in your mother tongue or other language both in oral and written form by using specific terminology and techniques of Historiography.
  12. Critically analysing informational speeches, especially in relation to ideology and ethnocentric and sexist bias.
  13. Describing the economic, social and political structures of Middle Ages.
  14. Describing the economic, social and political structures of the Middle Ages.
  15. Developing the ability of historical analysis and synthesis.
  16. Effectively expressing themselves and applying the argumentative and textual processes of formal and scientific texts.
  17. Examining a literary passage in Medieval Latin and connecting it with its general linguistic characteristics.
  18. Identifying main and supporting ideas and expressing them with linguistic correctness.
  19. Identifying the context of the historical processes.
  20. Identifying the main and secondary ideas and expressing them with linguistic correctness.
  21. Identifying the specific methods of History and its relationship with the analysis of particular facts.
  22. Interpreting and analysing documentary sources.
  23. Interpreting historical texts in relation to archaeological contexts.
  24. Interpreting material sources and the archaeological record.
  25. Knowing the main historiographical debates concerning the Middle Ages.
  26. Mastering and identifying the history of immediate environment.
  27. Mastering the Universal History of the Middle Ages.
  28. Mastering the diachronic structure of the past.
  29. Mastering the relevant languages to the necessary degree in the professional practice.
  30. Organising and planning the search of historical information.
  31. Reading and interpreting historiographical texts or original documents and transcribing, summarising and cataloguing information from the Middle Ages.
  32. Reading and interpreting historiographical texts or original documents and transcribing, summarizing and cataloguing information produced in the Middle Ages.
  33. Recognising the importance of controlling the quality of the work's results and its presentation.
  34. Relating elements and factors involved in the development of historical processes.
  35. Solve the methodological problems posed by the use of medieval historiographical sources.
  36. Solving problems autonomously.
  37. Solving the methodological problems posed by the use of medieval historiographical sources.
  38. Submitting works in accordance with both individual and small group demands and personal styles.
  39. Transmitting the results of archaeological research and clearly communicating conclusions in oral and written form to both specialised and non-specialised audiences.
  40. Use the specific technical vocabulary of interpretation and commentary of ancient texts.
  41. Using computing resources of the area of study of history.
  42. Using suitable terminology when drawing up an academic text.
  43. Using the characteristic computing resources of the field of History.
  44. Using the specific interpretational and technical vocabulary of the discipline.
  45. Working in teams respecting the other's points of view.

Content

1. The debate on the formation of feudalism

2. Late Roman society and taxation

3. The Germanic successor states

4. East during the 5th and 6th centuries

5. Arab expansion and the Umayyad state

6. The Abbasid state and Islamization

7. Al-Andalus, an Islamic society in the West

8. Construction and failure of the Carolingian empire

9. The dominical system

10. The new territorial principalities

11. Feudalism and the Peace of God

12. Gregorian reform and Crusade

Methodology

DIRECTED ACTIVITY 35%

Attendance at theoretical lessons led by the teacher.

Attendance to sessions of seminars and practices led by the teacher.

Comprehensive reading of texts.

SUPERVISED ACTIVITY 10%

Tutoring in the preparation of the proposed assignments

AUTONOMOUS ACTIVITY 55%

Personal study

Preparation of oral presentations.

Making reviews, assignments and analytical comments.

Annotation: Within the schedule set by the centre or degree programme, 15 minutes of one class will be reserved for students to evaluate their lecturers and their courses or modules through questionnaires.

Activities

Title Hours ECTS Learning Outcomes
Type: Directed      
Theoretical lectures and practices led by the teacher 60 2.4 13, 31, 30, 34, 37
Type: Supervised      
Tutoring 15 0.6 1, 13, 31, 45
Type: Autonomous      
Personal study and reading of texts 75 3 36, 11, 1, 15, 20, 31, 43

Assessment

The subject is evaluated by applying the following procedures:

1. Two partial tests: 60% final grade (30%+30%)

2. Assignments, reviews, summaries, analytical comments on texts, and other proposed documents (tables, graphs, maps, images ...) and preparation of oral comments or seminars: 30%

3. Attendance, participation and progression: 10%

Only the evaluation activities delivered within the deadlines established by the teacher will be recovered. No exercise can be submitted for the first time during the recovery period.

Practices (20%) and participation, attendance and progression (10%) do not recover.

A "not evaluable” student is the one who has not delivered any of the required evidence.

The copying of written sources (internet, books, papers, etc.) is a zero in the grade of the exercise and the student loses the call for the total of the subject.

The students will have the right to review the results of the tests carried out. The teacher will establish opportunely the mechanisms to do it.

The particular cases will receive, as it could not be otherwise, a specific treatment.

Assessment Activities

Title Weighting Hours ECTS Learning Outcomes
Assignments, reviews, summaries and analytical comments 30% 0 0 36, 11, 15, 29, 42, 18, 20, 31, 30, 38, 33, 37, 43
Attendance, participation and progression of the course 10% 0 0 12, 2, 5, 6, 36, 8, 7, 9, 11, 25, 17, 10, 19, 21, 22, 24, 23, 32, 31, 30, 39, 45, 40, 41, 43
Two partial tracking tests for the subject 60% (30%+30%) 0 0 3, 2, 4, 36, 11, 1, 13, 14, 15, 26, 28, 27, 16, 20, 31, 30, 34, 37, 35, 45, 44, 43

Bibliography

AA.DD.: Historia General de Africa. III. Africa entre los siglos VII y XI, Tecnos / Unesco, Madrid 1992.

BARTLETT, R.: La formación de Europa. Conquista, civilización y cambio cultural, 950-1350. Publicacions de la Universitat de València (PUV), 2003.

BONNASSIE, P.: La Catalogne du milieu du Xe a la fin du XIe siècle. Croissance et mutations d'une société, Toulouse 1975-1976 (traducció catalana Edicions 62).

BOUTRUCHE, R.: Señorío y feudalismo, Siglo XXI, Madrid 1970-1980.

CAMERON, A.: El Mundo mediterráneo en la antigüedad tardía, 395-600, Crítica, Barcelona 1998.

CHALMETA, P.: Invasión e islamización, Editorial Mapfre, Madrid 1994.

DURLIAT, J.: Les finances publiques de Diocletien aux carolingiens (284-889), Jhan Thorbecke Verlag Sigmaringen 1990.

FLORY, J.: La guerra santa. La formación de la idea de cruzada en el Occidente cristiano, Granada 2003.

GUERREAU, A.: El feudalismo, un horizonte teórico, Crítica, Barcelona 1984.

HALPHEN, L.: Charlemagne et l'Empire Carolingien, Paris 1947 (traducció castellana, Akal).

KING, P. D.: Derecho y sociedad en el reino visigodo, Alianza Ed., Madrid 1981.

MANTRAN, R.: La expansión musulmana, Nueva Clio, Barcelona 1982.

MOORE, R. I.: La primera revolución Europea, 980-1250. Crítica, Barcelona, 2002.

POLY, J.P. – BOURNAZEL, E.: El cambio feudal: siglos X-XII, Labor, Barcelona 1983.

SHABAN, M.H.: Historia del islam, Guadarrama, Madrid 1976.

TOUBERT, P.: Europa en su primer crecimiento: de Carlomagno al año mil, València – Granada 2006.

WICKHAM, CH.: Una Historia nueva de la Alta Edad Media: Europa y el mundo mediterráneo,400-800, Crítica, Barcelona 2009.

Software

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