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2020/2021

Cell Biology

Code: 102954 ECTS Credits: 6
Degree Type Year Semester
2502442 Medicine FB 1 1
The proposed teaching and assessment methodology that appear in the guide may be subject to changes as a result of the restrictions to face-to-face class attendance imposed by the health authorities.

Contact

Name:
Jordi Benet CatalÓ
Email:
Jordi.Benet@uab.cat

Use of Languages

Principal working language:
catalan (cat)
Some groups entirely in English:
No
Some groups entirely in Catalan:
No
Some groups entirely in Spanish:
No

Teachers

Joaquima Navarro FerretÚ
Pere Puig Rosell
Vicenš CatalÓ CahÝs
Sergio Garcia Segura
Immaculada Ponsa Arjona
Maria Oliver Bonet
Itziar Salaverria Frigola
Keyvan Torabi Asensio

Prerequisites

There are no prerequisites for taking the core subject of Cell Biology as it is a subject in the first semester of the first year. However, in order to ensure proper follow-up and the achievement of the learning objectives set out, it is recommended that students have a basic general knowledge of the structure, chemical composition and functions of the cells.

In addition, students should have good knowledge of English because many of the sources of information on this subject are in this language.

Objectives and Contextualisation

The subject of Cell Biology is attended to the first year of the Degree of Medicine, corresponding to a preclinical period, where students must obtain solid knowledge about the structural organization, functioning and regulation of the cells, Eukaryotic cells.

These basic skills are complemented with other basic and compulsory subjects in the Plan of Studies such as Biochemistry, Genetics, Histology and Physiology, which will provide the student with a good understanding of the structural and functional organization of the human organism in the normal state (non-pathological).

On the other hand, the theoretical knowledge acquired in the subject of Cell Biology is complemented by practical training in the laboratory that allows students to introduce the techniques of study of the somatic and germinal cells, in a state of rest or division as well as of the observation of the cellular ultrastructure.

 

The formative objective of Cell Biology is that the students at the end of the subject are able to:

- Recognize the main differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells

- Describe the structure, chemical composition and main functions of cell membranes

- Explain the processes of transport through the cell membranes

 

- Describe the organization and chemical composition of other elements of the cell surface

- Describe the structure, chemical composition and functions of the different cell compartments

- Explain the structure, chemical composition and functions of mitochondria and peroxisomes

- Describe the role of the cytosol

- Describe the structure, chemical composition and functions of the nuclear envelope and chromatin.

- Recognize the basic mechanisms of nuclear activity: replication and transcription

- List the different components of the cytoskeleton and describe its composition and structure

- Explain the contribution of the cytoskeleton in the formation of tissues

- Identify the molecules that participate in the control of the regulation of the cell cycle

- Describe the mechanisms involved in cell death for necrosis and apoptosis

- List and describe the different phases of the mitotic and myosic cell division and compare the two types of cell divisions

- Describe the process of male and female gametogenesis and compare the two types of processes

- Explain the Fertilization process

- Use properly the scientific terminology used in the field of Cell Biology

 

Competences

  • Communicate clearly, orally and in writing, with other professionals and the media.
  • Convey knowledge and techniques to professionals working in other fields.
  • Critically assess and use clinical and biomedical information sources to obtain, organise, interpret and present information on science and health.
  • Demonstrate basic research skills.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the principles and physical, biochemical and biological processes that help to understand the functioning of the organism and its disorders.
  • Demonstrate understanding of the basic sciences and the principles underpinning them.
  • Demonstrate understanding of the importance and the limitations of scientific thought to the study, prevention and management of diseases.
  • Demonstrate understanding of the mechanisms of alterations to the structure and function of the systems of the organism in illness.
  • Demonstrate understanding of the organisation and functions of the genome, the mechanisms of transmission and expression of genetic information and the molecular and cellular bases of genetic analysis.
  • Demonstrate understanding of the structure and function of the body systems of the normal human organism at different stages in life and in both sexes.
  • Formulate hypotheses and compile and critically assess information for problem-solving, using the scientific method.
  • Maintain and sharpen one's professional competence, in particular by independently learning new material and techniques and by focusing on quality.
  • Recognise the effects of growth, development and ageing on individuals and their social environment.

Learning Outcomes

  1. Communicate clearly, orally and in writing, with other professionals and the media.
  2. Convey knowledge and techniques to professionals working in other fields.
  3. Demonstrate basic research skills.
  4. Describe the functional and organisational structure of hereditary nuclear and mitochondrial material.
  5. Describe the processes involved in somatic and germinal cell proliferation: mitosis and meiosis.
  6. Describe the processes of cell differentiation, ageing and death.
  7. Explain how alterations to cell components lead to structural and functional alterations to systems of the human organism.
  8. Explain the molecular and cellular significance of tissue and system structure.
  9. Formulate hypotheses and compile and critically assess information for problem-solving, using the scientific method.
  10. Identify the basic functional and organisational structure of hereditary nuclear and mitochondrial material.
  11. Identify the basic processes of life on various levels of organisation: cell, organ and individual.
  12. Identify the cell processes that can be the cause or the consequence of pathological manifestations in the organism.
  13. Identify the main cellular processes involved in growth, development and ageing in individuals and their social environment.
  14. Identify the mechanisms and the molecular and cellular processes that can be the cause or the consequence of pathological manifestations in the organism.
  15. Integrate the functions of the the different cell organelles and structures with the overall functioning of the cell.
  16. Maintain and sharpen one's professional competence, in particular by independently learning new material and techniques and by focusing on quality.
  17. Relate the structure of the different parts of cell to its functioning.
  18. Use specific bibliographic sources in cell biology to work independently on acquiring further knowledge.

Content

Basic techniques in Cell Biology. Plasma membrane. Internal membrane system. Energy conversion organs. Cytoskeleton Extracellular matrix. Nucleus and its relation with the cytoplasm. Cell cycle: Interphase and Mitosis. Cell Death: Necrosis and Apoptosis. Meiosis. Male and female gametogenesis. Fertilization.

Distributive blocks

 
A. Levels of cell organization. Cell theory and general organization of the cell. General characteristics of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.
 
B. Plasma membrane. Macromolecular organization of the plasma membrane and glycocalyx. Characteristics of the membrane: fluidity and asymmetry. Functions of the membrane: transport of ions, small molecules, macromolecules and particles. Processes of endocytosis, pinocytosis, potocytosis, phagocytosis and exocytosis
 
C. Internal membrane system. Introduction to cell division and the traffic of proteins and other molecules. Elements of the internal membranous system. Structure and functions of the rugged and smooth endoplasmic reticulum, of the Golgi apparatus, of the endosomes and lysosomes

D. Mitochondria and peroxisomes. Structure and composition and functions of mitochondria and peroxisome. Functions of mitochondria and peroxisome. Oxidation in mitochondria and peroxisomes. Biogenesis. Mitochondrial genome and protein synthesis. Import of proteins and lipids from the cytosol

E. Cytosol and Cytoskeleton. Functions of the cytosol. Cytoskeleton Components: Functions. Structure of actin filaments, microtubules and intermediate filaments. Stable and stable microtubules. Associated proteins of actin and microtubule filaments. Types of intermediate filaments and presence according to cell types

F. Cell adhesion. Membrane and adhesion molecules. Structure and functions and the different types of joints: occlusives, anchorages, cell-cell adhesives, cell-matrix extracellular adhesives, and communicants

G. Nucleus and nuclear activity. Structure of its components: nuclear envelope, nuclear pores, nuclear lamina, nuclear matrix, nucleus, nucleoplasm and chromatin. Structure and organization of nuclear chromatin. Nuclear activity: processes of transcription, maturation and replication of chromatin

H. Control of the Cell Cycle. Phases of the cell cycle. Cell cycle control mechanism: Control points and participating components. Role of the cyclin-protein complex: Cyclin-dependent kinases

I. Cell Death. Differences between cell death for necrosis and apoptosis. Mechanism involved in apoptosis. Mitochondria paper

J. Mitosi i Meiosi. Mitotic division and phases: prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase and telophase and the cytokinesis process. Cycles of chromosomal condensation, fragmentation and assembly of the nucleus wrap. Meiotic division and the two divisions, reduction and equatorial, and the respective phases. Differences and similarities between the meiotic and mitotic process. Biological meaning of meiosis

K. Gametogenesis and Fertilization. Male gametogenesis. Female gametogenesis. Comparison of the two processes. Fertilization mechanism

 

Methodology

Directed Teaching
Theory lecture. Classroom practices. Laboratory practices. Specialized seminars

Supervised Teaching

Problem based learning

Autonomous Teaching
Personal study. Elaboration of works

ATENTION: The proposed teaching methodology may experience some modifications depending on the restrictions to face-to-face activities enforced by health authorities.

Activities

Title Hours ECTS Learning Outcomes
Type: Directed      
THEORY (TE) / CLASSICAL PRACTICES (PAUL) / LABORATORY PRACTICES (PLAB) / SPECIALIZED SEMINARS (SESP) 53 2.12 1, 3, 6, 5, 4, 2, 8, 7, 9, 14, 13, 11, 12, 10, 15, 16, 17, 18
Type: Supervised      
PROBLEM-BASED LEARNING (ABP) 23 0.92 1, 3, 6, 5, 4, 2, 8, 7, 9, 14, 13, 11, 12, 10, 15, 16, 17, 18
Type: Autonomous      
DEVELOPMENT OF WORK / PERSONAL STUDY 69 2.76 1, 3, 6, 5, 4, 2, 8, 7, 9, 14, 13, 11, 12, 10, 15, 16, 17, 18

Assessment

Continued evaluation

The continuous assessment of the subject consists of two partial examinations of combined content (42% and 58% respectively of the final grade).

The first partial (42% of the final grade) is an objective test that evaluates the following contents: i) Theory of the first subjects (from A to D and cytosol) (32%), ii) the first two Seminars (5 %) and iii) the first session of Labor Practices (5%).

The second part (58% of the final grade) is an objective test that evaluates the following contents: i) Theory of the last subjects (from E, except Cytosol, to K) (38%) and ii) the last three Seminars (10%) and the second and the third sessions of Labor Practices (10%).

The mark of the subject is obtained by adding the weighted notes of the two partial exams and the two practice exams. To pass the subject, the qualifications of the two partial exams must be equal to or greater than 5 and obtain a global grade equal to or greater than 5 out of 10.

 

Final exam or recovery

If a student has not passed the subject in the continuous assessment process, they may submit to a recovery exam. To participate in the recovery must have been previously evaluated in a set of activities whose weight equals to a minimum of two thirds of the total grade of the subject. The marks equal or superior to 5 will be reserved, obtained in the partial ones.

 The recovery exam consists of two parts:

Part 1 of the review exam (42% of the final grade) is an objective test that evaluates the following contents:i) Theory of the first subjects (from A to D and cytosol) (32%), ii) , the first two Seminars (5%) and iii) the first session of Labor Practices (5%).

Part 2 of the recovery exam (58% of the final grade) is an objective test that evaluates the following contents: i) Theory (38%) of the last subjects (from E, except Cytosol, to K), ii) the last three Seminars (10%) and the second and the thirdsessionsof Labor Practices (10%).

 Students who have passed only one of the two partials will be able to examine only the corresponding part of the suspended part.

The final mark of recovery of the subject will be the sum of the weighted note of the examination of recovery plus the weighted notes of the two tests of practices. In the event that a student has passed a partial, this note, correspondingly weighted, will be taken into account for the calculation of the exam of the recovery exam.

Students who wish to improve their grades have the option of submitting themselves to a part or all of the recovery exam. You must request it, in advance, to the coordinator of the subject. The note previously obtained in the continuous assessment will be replaced by the mark obtained in the recovery exam.

 The day and time of the revisions of the partial exams and the recovery exam will be announced immediately for the publication of the notes.

The subject will be described as "non-evaluable" when the student has not been submitted to any of the partial or retrieval exams.

 

ATENTION: Student’s assessment may experience some modifications depending on the restrictions to face-to-face activities enforced by healthauthorities.

Assessment Activities

Title Weighting Hours ECTS Learning Outcomes
Practice: written assessments through test essays of restricted questions and objective tests of multiple choice items 15% 1 0.04 6, 5, 9, 14, 13, 12, 15, 16, 17, 18
Seminars: evaluations written through objective tests of multiple choice items 15% 1 0.04 1, 3, 5, 2, 9, 13, 12, 15, 16, 17
Theory: evaluations written through objective tests: multiple choice items 70% 3 0.12 6, 5, 4, 8, 7, 14, 13, 11, 12, 10, 15, 17

Bibliography

BASIC BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1 - "Biología Molecular de la Célula". Alberts y col. 6ª edición. Ed. Omega. Barcelona, 2016

2 - "Molecular Biology of the Cell". Alberts et al. 6th edition. Garland Sciences. New York, 2015

3 - "La Célula". Cooper y Hausman. 7ª edición. Ed. Marbán Libros S.L. Madrid, 2017

4 - "The Cell". Cooper & Hausman 7th edition, Sinauer Associetes (Oxford University Press), 2017

5 - "Introducción a la Biología Celular". Alberts y col. 3ª ed. Ed. Médica Panamericana. Madrid, 2010

6 - "Biología Celular Biomédica" Calvo A. Elsevier. Barcelona, 2015

7 - "Biología Celular y Molecular". Karp. 6ª edició. Ed. Mac Graw-Hill Interamericana S.A. Mèxic, 2011
 
8 - "Molecular Cell Biology". Lodish et al. 8th edition. WH Freeman and Company. New York, 2016

9 - "The World of the Cell". Becker et al. 7th edition. Pearson. San Francisco, 2008

 

INTERNET RESOURCES

 - Books: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=Books

 - Open access review articles and accessible review articles from the computers of the UAB Network. (If you are outside the campus, through the ARE service, Access to Electronic Resources service)